Alzheimer’s and Dementia Home Care

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Home Care

Home care for dementia and Alzheimer's takes specialized abilities. Our services are focused firmly on the individual. Dementia slowly interferes with one’s mental ability to manage everyday life. Our memory care services create a safe and stimulating environment for those with dementia--including its most common form, Alzheimer’s.

At home, your loved one with Alzheimer's will take advantage of familiar sights and sounds yet a few adjustments will be required to make the house easy-to-navigate and also safe. The Alzheimer's Association suggests considering the home "through the eyes of a person with dementia," without creating as well restrictive a setup. Here are just a couple of suggested house security pointers:

  • Maintain stairways well-lit
  • Lock unsafe areas, such as stairwells, storage locations and workrooms
  • Lock drugs in a closet or cabinet
  • See to it carbon monoxide detectors, fire extinguishers and smoke detectors work
  • Remove items that can trigger injury
  • Establish the water temperature to 120 levels or less to prevent scalding
  • What is Alzheimer's home treatment?

What is Alzheimer’s home care?

Alzheimer’s home care is a specialized service different from traditional home care, because individuals with Alzheimer’s have distinct care needs from other seniors. In Alzheimer’s care, the care plan is designed around the unique challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as the recipient’s individual care needs. Care is provided in the comfort of the senior’s home, and services are performed by caregivers who are uniquely qualified to care for individuals living with Alzheimer’s.

We make it possible for those coping with Alzheimer's to age in place as long as possible. Research has shown that familiar surroundings play an important role in the well-being of those with early stages of Alzheimer's. A move to a nursing facility can trigger confusion, anxiety, stress, and agitation. Our Alzheimer's care services ensure those with Alzheimer's are able to remain at home where they are happiest and most comfortable and provide reliable and consistent support at home.

Our Alzheimer's caregivers can also relieve the burdens faced by family caregivers, who may find themselves overwhelmed by the responsibilities that come with Alzheimer's care. We provide regular monitoring, routine check-ins, and an after-hours line so that you and your family have the peace of mind you need.

Our Alzheimer’s caregivers can also relieve the burdens faced by family caregivers, who may find themselves overwhelmed by the responsibilities that come with Alzheimer’s care. We provide regular monitoring, routine check-ins, and an after-hours line so that you and your family have the peace of mind you need.

About Our Alzheimer’s Care Services

After an initial diagnosis of Alzheimer's, family members are most often faced with difficult decisions about providing care for their loved one. Family members who are separated by great distances must make hard choices about how to provide Alzheimer’s care services. You have choices, and we can help.

Our caregivers are trained to deliver specialized care. Seemingly small changes to how one delivers care result in better care. Some examples of such care include:

  • Schedule wisely. Establish a daily routine. Some tasks, such as bathing or medical appointments, are easier when the person is most alert and refreshed. Allow some flexibility for spontaneous activities or particularly difficult days.
  • Take your time and have patience. Anticipate that tasks may take longer than they used to and schedule more time for them. Allow time for breaks during tasks.
  • Involve the person. Allow the person with dementia to do as much as possible with the least amount of assistance. For example, he or she might be able to set the table with the help of visual cues or dress independently if you lay out clothes in the order they go on.
  • Provide choices. Provide some, but not too many, choices every day. For example, provide two outfits to choose from, ask if he or she prefers a hot or cold beverage, or ask if he or she would rather go for a walk or see a movie.
  • Provide simple instructions. People with dementia best understand clear, one-step communication.
  • Limit napping. Avoid multiple or prolonged naps during the day. This can minimize the risk of getting days and nights reversed.
  • Reduce distractions. Turn off the TV and minimize other distractions at mealtime and during conversations to make it easier for the person with dementia to focus.
  • "Therapeutic Fibbing". It's important not to correct or tell dementia patients about events they should "know". Dad you "know Grandma died 10 years ago!". This type of response not only causes you frustration but also causes the person with dementia to relive the grief and distress of someone dying all over again. Better to redirect.

Encouraging activities that stimulate memory

Activities that encourage cognitive functions are one path to a better day. There are several types of these activities.

  • Short-term memory exercises: Simple daily memory exercises can be things like asking questions about what happened this morning or yesterday.
  • Long-term memory exercises: More advanced memory activities are those that involve long-term memory callbacks. Occasionally browsing family photo albums is a good way to stimulate long-term memories.